Multidisciplinary Solutions for Global Diseases

BIO 311 - Spring 2013 - Cedar Crest College

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BIO 311 - Multidisciplinary Solutions for Global Diseases - 2 credits  (capstone course)
A child dies every 30 seconds from malaria.  Dysentery, AIDS, influenza, cancer, tuberculosis, cholera, cardiovascular disease, and hepatitis also have a significant impact on the human population.  Minimizing the disease-related suffering and deaths around the world requires new ideas and effort.  This capstone course provides an opportunity for students, through a formal presentation and written thesis, to propose their multidisciplinary solution for health-related problems within the region of their respective cultural experience. Critical-thinking and leadership skills are imperative.  Prerequisites: cultural experience; all courses required for the minor except for the upper-level elective.

Website: http://www2.cedarcrest.edu/academic/bio/hale/capstone/index.html

Instructors:
Alan Hale, Ph.D. [SC134; abhale@cedarcrest.edu; x3510]

Prerequisites: All other requirements for the Global Diseases minor, with the exception of the upper-level elective.

Class Time/Location:  T 4:00-5:30 PM; Location: SC138

Textbooks:  Needham, C.A. and R. Canning.  2003. Global Disease Eradication: The Race for the Last Child. American Society for Microbiology Press. 196pp.

Pre-course Responsibilities: A thesis requires a thorough synthesis of what has been learned in courses and through one’s cultural experience.  Consequently, it is highly recommended that one begin writing the thesis soon after the cultural experience and certainly before the start of this final semester.  The director of the global diseases minor will have conveyed this recommendation at the end of one’s junior year, if not sooner, and will have met with each student during the fall semester of her senior year to discuss her thesis plans.

Course Objectives
The mission of the Global Diseases minor is to provide our society with individuals who have an enhanced awareness of global diseases, a sincere interest in finding solutions to the many problems associated with these diseases, and the skills and initiative required to effect change.  Key to the success of the graduates of this minor is an understanding that no discipline stands alone in solving global problems. BIO 311 is the capstone course for the minor; the course objectives, as they relate to the overall mission, are to help students (1) organize their thoughts and data, and ultimately propose a plan to address health problems within their chosen country, and (2) develop their ability to effectively convey their plans to others via their writing and speaking.  The next step is the real world...where there is a real need for their services.

Learning Outcomes & Assessment

Students who have successfully completed this course will have demonstrated:
1. An understanding of the multidisciplinary nature of dealing with the challenge of finding solutions to human diseases.
Assessment: Three chapter discussions, one abstract, one presentation and subsequent discussion, and one thesis (draft and final).
2. An appreciation for the cultural differences among nations around the globe.
Assessment: Three chapter discussions, one abstract, one presentation and subsequent discussion, and one thesis (draft and final).
3. The ability to create a plan and then effectively present this plan orally and in writing.
Assessment: One abstract, one presentation and subsequent discussion, and one thesis (draft and final).
4. An understanding of the value of collaboration in effecting change.
Assessment: Three chapter discussions, one abstract, one presentation and subsequent discussion, and one thesis (draft and final).

Attendance
Attendance is expected. If, for some reason, you are unable to attend class, notify Dr. Hale as soon as possible. Under some circumstances (e.g., book discussions), a written assignment would be an appropriate substitute.

Content of Thesis & Presentation
Primary Focus: Your multidisciplinary solution for combating a particular disease or health problem in the country/region of your cultural experience. Including, but not restricted to:
    •    Thorough description of your cultural experience
    •    Apparent cultural differences between your chosen region and the U.S.
    •    Disease-related situation in selected region
    •    Political, economic, and social structure of region
    •    The current approach to dealing with the particular disease(s) noted above
    •    Your proposed plan of action designed to improve the health of individuals within your chosen country  (This section is very important and should illustrate your multidisciplinary training.)

Examples of Theses and Proper Format (former Global Diseases minors)  
      •    Health Implications of Poor Water Quality in the Central Region of Ghana  (Shannon Ronca)
      •    Improving Healthcare and Disease in Belize  (Kathaleen Deane)

Evaluation

Activity
Points
Session/Info
Participation in An Evening of Cultural Experiences - Slide show of overseas experience shared with interested members of the Cedar Crest community
40
Scheduled for an evening early in the semester. Exact timing will be discussed with participants.
Weekly Progress Reports on Thesis
50

Participation in Chapter Discussions [Global Disease Eradication: The Race for the Last Child]
50 Five chapters; 10 pts. each
Thesis: Multidisciplinary Synthesis of Cultural Experience and Proposed Solutions for Current Disease-Related Situation(s) Within Same Global Region (specific topic unique to each student)


Section Drafts as noted on session schedule
90
3 submissions (electronic version only); 30 pts. each
Presentation Abstract (illustrated and for web site) 
25 Due one week before presentation; submitted electronically in either Word or .pdf format
Presentation & Subsequent Discussion 100 35 min presentation followed by 10 minute discussion of presented material; submit electronic copy of presentation
Thesis: Initial Submission (Polished Draft)
100 Due on or before Session 11; returned Session 12, if not sooner; electronic version only
Thesis: Final 100 Due on last day of classes; subsequent updates, if necessary, will occur prior to the end of final exams. Submit electronic version initially. Once approved, submit an electronic copy (if changes had been made) and a hard copy for binding.

Disability Accommodation
Students with documented disabilities that have been processed by the Office of Academic Services should contact Dr. Hale early in the semester to discuss appropriate accommodations.

Honor Code and Academic Standards of Integrity
Students enrolled in BIO 311 are expected to abide by the Cedar Crest College Honor Code and the Academic Standards of Integrity, as described in the college catalog and in A Student's Guide to CCC.  Plagiarism and poor classroom behavior will be dealt with harshly; the former resulting in a grade of "F" for the course and a report sent to the Office of the Provost.

COURSE SCHEDULE

Session
Date
Topic
Readings
1
January 15
Introduction to Course
Discussion of Thesis Project, Format, and Related Activities
Goals of An Evening of Cultural Experiences
Syllabus
2
January 22
Global Disease Eradication - Discussion
Eradication: a Prologue / Malaria and the Magic Bullet
1-42
3
January 29
Global Disease Eradication - Discussion
Smallpox: The Right Disease, the Right Time
Submit electronic copy of thesis title page and detailed table of contents two days prior to this session.
43-76
4
February 5
Preview & Discussion of Presentations for An Evening of Cultural Experiences

5
February 12
An Evening of Cultural Experiences
(5:00-6:30 PM)

6
February 19
Thesis Updates - Discussion
Submit electronic copy of thesis sections completed to date (at least 1/4 of thesis) two days prior to this session.

7
February 26
Global Disease Eradication - Discussion
Polio: the Rise and Fall of a Disease
77-116
-
March 5
Spring Break

8
March 12
Global Disease Eradication - Discussion
The Future for Global Disease Eradication
117-146
9
March 19
Thesis Updates - Discussion
Submit electronic copy of thesis sections completed to date (at least 3/4 of thesis) two days prior to this session.

10
March 26
Global Disease Eradication - Discussion
Epilogue - Voices from the Eradication Campaigns
147-182
11
April 2
Thesis Updates - Discussion
Submit electronic copy of polished full draft of thesis two days prior to this session.

12
April 9
Continued Thesis Development and Weekly Progress Reports
13
April 16
Previews and Discussion of Final Presentations
Submit electronic copy of presentation abstract two days prior to this session.

14
April 23
Formal Presentation of Thesis Project - All Interested are Welcome

Last Day of
Classes
April 30
Written Thesis Due - Submit Electronic Copy; Once Approved, Submit Hard Copy




Alan B. Hale (abhale@cedarcrest.edu)
Last updated: 16 November  '12