F.A.Q. about Internships

Students

Faculty

Employer/Site Supervisor

Students

Q: What criteria do I need to meet in order to complete an internship?
A: Internships are open to all students who have completed their sophomore year and who have earned a minimum of 60 credits.

Transfers: Transfer students must have completed at least one semester at cedar Crest College.

Students must also have a minimum cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0 and have completed the appropriate coursework required by the nature of the internship.

Q: What if I do not have a minimum of 60 credits?
A: The department chair in your major must approve the internship in addition to your academic advisor and your faculty supervisor.

Q: What are the requirements in order to receive credit for my internship?
A: Students must complete and submit an Internship Contract with the appropriate faculty approval and signatures, on or before the deadlines provided by the career Planning Center. The deadlines are:

  • November 30th for Spring internships
  • April 29th for summer and Fall internships
  • August 11th for students local to the Lehigh Valley
If any of these dates falls on a Saturday or Sunday, the following Monday is the actual deadline date.

Q: How many hours do I need to work?
A:Credits are awarded based on the following number of minimum hours worked during a 15-week semester:
  • 3 credits – a minimum total of 120 hours are required (10 hours/week) for 10-12 weeks
  • 6 credits – a minimum total of 240 hours are required (20 hours/week) for 10-12 weeks

Summer internships: Students seeking summer internships are eligible for 3 or 6 credits. The minimum number of weeks required in a summer internship is 10 weeks. The student’s Academic Department Chair and the Provost must approve summer internships of more than 3 credits.
 
Q: What are my roles and responsibilities as an intern?
A: Students must register and pay for internship credits as they would for any course sponsored by the College. Students must obtain the required internship forms from the Career Planning Center (or download them from the Career Center website) including the Contract, Guidelines, and Statement of Intent. The Contract outlines the internship dates, hours, job description and written assignment in addition to all required signatures. Student must provide all information requested on the Contract, including signatures and an internship description, before returning all forms to the Career Planning Center. An internship student will complete all required assignments and submit directly to faculty supervisor by the deadlines specified.

Q: I am about to start/already started an internship. How do I get academic credit for it?
A: The Registrar will not accept registration for an internship without the completed Internship Contract. Students must complete all internship paperwork and registration forms before beginning to work at their internship site. Students will not get academic credit for hours completed before a contract was approved.

Q: Can I complete an internship with my current employer?
A: Students are not permitted to enroll in an internship for credit with a current employer, performing similar job-related tasks, unless new learning projects are assigned.

Q: Can I complete more than one internship at a time?
A: Students may only do one internship per semester.

Q: Can I continue my internship beyond one semester?
A: Students may elect to continue an internship beyond a single semester. However, to earn academic credit, the internship must provide a new or different challenge.  

Q: What if I leave the internship before completing my hours?
A: If a student leaves an internship for any reason, whether it is of their own free will or they are asked to leave by the internship site, they forfeit any hours completed and will be withdrawn by the Career Planning Center. If this occurs after the drop/add period, the student may not register for another internship during that semester.
 
Q: What if something goes wrong?
A: Review the "What Do You Do If Things Go Wrong?" guidelines for suggestions on how to work through concerns.

Liability concerns: Liability for an internship experience can vary depending on the circumstances of the internship. Normally when you are involved with an internship where you are being paid, you are considered an employee of the organization with which you are interning. As an employee you are covered by the liability insurance of your employer. Internships where you are not being paid fall into two categories: academic credit received and academic credit not received. The college carries insurance to cover claims arising out of academic credit internship covering bodily injury or property damage. However, individual student liability is not covered where academic credit is not received. In these instances, students should consider obtaining a policy to cover their personal liability and/or check their homeowner insurance policy to see if it would cover their individual situation. No insurance is available for internships without academic credit.

 

Faculty

Q: What are my roles and responsibilities?
A: Academic supervisors: Advise and counsel students regarding internship site selections and assist in avoiding course overload and course prerequisites. Determine if the proposed internship meets the approval of the academic department and sign Internship Contract.

Faculty Supervisor: Approve student’s proposed internship site, credit hours, and monitor student’s progress through weekly or monthly meetings. Determine internship written assignment(s), evaluate student’s performance, assign appropriate grade, and sign Internship Contract.

Q: Under what circumstances can I waive my department’s internship requirement?
A: Department Chairs, in consultation with the Provost, may elect to waive their department’s internship requirement in special circumstances including, but not limited to, the following:

  1. In instances where an internship requirement would present an undue hardship for the student. For example, in instances where the student has a physical, emotional, learning or language disability or handicap or a unique personal circumstance that would prevent them from either successfully obtaining, maintaining or completing the requirements of an internship.
  2. Where the department deems a student to have already satisfied the practical experience requirement of an internship. For example, through completion of an independent study project requiring fieldwork.

Q: What if something goes wrong?
A: Review the "What Do You Do If Things Go Wrong?" guidelines for suggestions on how to work through concerns.

 

Employer/Site Supervisor

Q: What is an internship?
A: An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which a student has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. Characteristics include:
  • Internships can be full-time or part-time (120 hours or 240 hours)
  • Generally a one-time experience.
  • May be paid or non-paid.
  • Internships may be part of an educational program and carefully monitored and evaluated for academic credit, or internships can be a part of a learning plan that someone develops individually.
  • An important element that distinguishes an internship from a short term job or volunteer work is that intentional “learning agenda” is structured into the experience.
  • Learning activities common to most internships include learning objectives, observation, reflection, evaluation and assessment.
  • An effort is made to establish a reasonable balance between the intern’s learning goals and the specific work and organization needs done.
  • Internships promote academic, career and/ or personal development.
Q: What are the benefits of having an internship program?
A: Internships provide a cost-effective way to bring eager and talented workers into your company to support a variety of work functions. In addition, internships offer several other benefits including:
  • A method for identifying potential new hires
  • Year round source of highly motivated pre-professionals
  • Visibility of you organization is increased on campus
  • Quality candidates for temporary or seasonal positions and projects
  • Your image in the community is enhanced as you contribute your expertise to the educational enterprise

Q: What are my roles and responsibilities?
A: Provide orientation, supervision, and work projects to the student intern. Meet regularly with intern to provide direction and work progression and complete a mid-term and final Evaluation Form of the student’s performance. Provide a job description to students so it can be handed in along with the Contract.

Q: What if something goes wrong?
A: Review the "What Do You Do If Things Go Wrong?" guidelines for suggestions on how to work through concerns.
 
Liability concerns: Liability for an internship experience can vary depending on the circumstances of the internship. Normally when a student is involved with an internship where remuneration is received, the student is considered an employee of the organization with which they are interning. As an employee, the student is covered by the liability insurance of the employer. Internships where remuneration is not received fall into two categories: academic credit received and academic credit not received. The college carries insurance to cover claims arising out of academic credit internship covering bodily injury or property damage. However, individual student liability is not covered where academic credit is not received. In these instances, students should consider obtaining a policy to cover their personal liability and/or check their homeowner insurance policy to see if it would cover their individual situation. No insurance is available for internships without academic credit.

Last Updated: 7/24/12